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Tombouctou Manuscripts Project

Tombouctou MS

Since its inception over a decade ago, the Tombouctou Manuscripts Project has been dedicated to the study and translation of a vast and varied collection of digitized manuscripts in Timbuktu. The project addresses the history of the book in Africa and aims to clarify the material archive in which these texts reside. In recent years, the Tombouctou Manuscripts Project has begun to focus on Arabic writing cultures throughout the Africa, thus situating itself in broader literary, historical, and theoretical discourses. 

 

The International Dunhuang Project

For over a millennium, the cave library in Dunhuang—an oasis town on the Silk Road in western China—remained sealed and secluded until 1900. Today, the International Dunhuang Project is committed to providing free, worldwide access to the wealth of manuscripts, documents, paintings, and artifacts that have been excavated from the cave, complete with cataloguing and contextual information. The IDP provides opportunities for outreach and education, and through its collaborative efforts in research, digitization, and cataloguing, will soon have 90% of its collections available online for everyone to explore.

 

Rome Reborn

This exciting project has set out to create a digital model of Rome’s development from its earliest settlement until its decline (c. 552 C.E.). Rome Reborn has gathered myriad archaeological data from excavations, inscriptions, and literary sources, as well as quantitative data about building types throughout the fourteen regions of the city. All of this data has been collected in order to  reconstruct the city as accurately as possible through 3D images and modeling. The developers of this project are hoping to work collaboratively with other scholars in order that their digital model be as accurate and detailed as possible.

 

China Historical Geographic Information System

Established in 2001, CHGIS provides scholars and researchers a database of administrative units and populated areas in China from the unification (222 B.C.E.) through the end of the dynastic period (1911 C.E.). With access to this wealth of statistical information, users of CHGIS are able to easily search and track the changes to all recorded geographical entities in Chinese history, and can compare such evolutions to current geographic formations. The spatial and temporal relationships offered by CHGIS prove to be an invaluable tool for any scholar of Chinese geography and history.

 

Restoring Byzantium (Kariye Camii)

This project is centered on the building and expansion of the Late Byzantine church, Kariye Camii. The church, which underwent a massive restoration in the first half of the thirteenth century, was a mosque in the nineteenth century, resulting in a rich and beautiful combination of interior and exterior architecture. In 2004, Restoring Byzantium held an exhibit at the Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Art Gallery at Columbia University in order to display the artwork and objects rediscovered during renovation. The project site offers many resources to visitors including photographs of artwork, before-and-after images, and extensive bibliographies.

 

Zamani Project

In an effort to increase awareness of African heritage, researchers at the University of Cape Town launched the Zamani Project. The project team works to create Geographic Information Systems and 3D models of archeological sites in places such as Ghana, Mali, Kenya, Ethiopia, Tanzania, and South Africa. Other interesting features the project offers include panorama tours, laser scans, and the possibility for exploration of a virtual world. Those involved in the project have been researching and documenting African cultural heritage sites since 2004. The Zamani Project serves as a wonderful combination of information on architecture and the landscapes that surround the cultural sites.